[ZBIORCZY] DINOZAURY - NOWE INFORMACJE 2006-2009

Czyli co piszczy w paleontologicznej "trawie" :)
Awatar użytkownika
Daniel Madzia
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1609
Rejestracja: 15 marca 2006, o 12:39
Lokalizacja: Třinec, Česká republika
Kontakt:

Nowe prace naukowe

Post autor: Daniel Madzia »

Z DML:
Fiorillo, A.R. 2008. Dinosaurs of Alaska: implications for the Cretaceous
origin of Beringia; pp. 313-326 in Blodgett, R.B. and Stanley, G.D., Jr.
(eds.), The Terrane Puzzle: New Perspectives on Paleontology and
Stratigraphy from the North American Cordillera. Geological Society of
America Special Paper 442.


ABSTRACT: Fossils within accreted terranes are typically used to describe
the age or origin of the exotic geologic blocks. However, accretion may also
provide new pathways for faunal exchange between previously disconnected
landmasses. One such landmass, the result of accretion, is Beringia, that
entity encompassing northeastern Asia and northwestern North America and the surmised land connection between the two regions.
The present concept of Beringia as a Quaternary subcontinent includes a
climatic component in the form of glacial advances and retreats driving
changes in sea level. These changes may have facilitated exchanges of marine
biota between the Pacific Ocean and Arctic Basin, or exchanges of
terrestrial faunas and floras between Asia and North America. The Beringian
ecosystem includes specializations of the fl ora and fauna, especially in
the vertebrate fauna.
A review of tectonic reconstructions and the striking taxon-free
parallel patterns in data on the Cretaceous and Quaternary fauna and flora
suggest that a generalized concept of Beringia should be formally extended
back in time to the Cretaceous. A significant shift in emphasis of defining
variables occurs with this extension. Climate, in the form of meteorological
phenomena, and geologic history are important variables in the previously
recognized definition of Beringia. The extension of Beringia into the
Cretaceous implies that Beringia is rooted in its accretionary rather than
its climatic history; in other words, the geographic pattern as the result
of tectonics is the defining parameter for Beringia.



Gierlinski, G.D. 2008. Dinosaur track assemblages in the Oxfordian of
Poland; pp. 43-44 in Uchman, A. (ed.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology Abstract Book. Polish Geological Institute, Warszawa.


ABSTRACT: There are two main track-bearing horizons in the Oxfordian
carbonates of the Holy Cross Mts., the middle Oxfordian Baltow Coral
Limestones and the late Oxfordian Blaziny Oolite Limestones (following
strata recognition of Gutowski, 1998). The number of new finds in these
deposits increased importantly during the last years, since first reports
published in 2002 (Gierlinski, Niedzwiedzki, 2002; Gierlinski, Sabath,
2002). According to the present knowledge, dinosaur track assemblage of the Baltow Coral Limestones (Fig. 1A-E) comprises mostly diminutive ichnofauna,
small ornithopod footprints of Dinehichnus, small and medium theropod
tracks, such as Wildeichnus, Jialingpus and Therangospodus, and the
stegosaurian pedal print labeled as Stegopodus sensu Gierlinski et at.
(2005). The Blaziny unit reveals relatively larger forms, which include
sauropod tracks of Brontopodus, numerous Dinehichnus specimens, medium theropod ichnite of Therangospodus and the large one classed as
Megalosauripus (Fig. 1F-I).



Gierlinski, G.D. 2008. Late Cretaceous dinosaur tracks from the Roztocze
Hills of Poland; pp. 44 in Uchman, A. (ed.), Second International Congress
on Ichnology Abstract Book. Polish Geological Institute, Warszawa.


ABSTRACT: Late Cretaceous and Miocene footprints in the Roztocze region
represent ones of the latest finds of vertebrate tracks in Poland
(Gierlinski, 2007; Gierlinski et al., 2007). Dinosaur tracks came from the
arenaceous limestones, which contain the late Maastrichtian foraminiferan
assemblages. Footprints were found in the Potok site (approximate
coordinates: N 50°32.609', E 023°04.203') and Mlynarka Mount (N 50°30.790',
E 023°03.784'). Both sites have been vandalized. The Potok original
specimens (Fig. lB, D) are stored in the GuciĂłw Cottage, while the replicas
of the Mlyfiarka Mt. material (Fig. 1A, C) are housed by the Polish
Geological Institute and the Baltow theme park. The collected material
includes Velociraptorichnus sp. (small didactyl eumaniraptoran footprint),
Irenesauripus sp (large tridactyl theropod track), Macropodosaurus sp.
(tetradactyl plantigrade therizinosauroid footprint) and cf. Hadrosauropodus
sp. (hadrosaurid pedal and manual print).



Gierlinski, G.D., Lockley, M.G., Singer, T., and Niedzwiedzki, G. 2008.
Protoceratopsid skeleton and track association from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia; pp. 45 in Uchman, A. (ed.), Second International Congress on
Ichnology Abstract Book. Polish Geological Institute, Warszawa.


ABSTRACT: The articulated protoceratopsid skeleton, the specimen ZPAL Mg
D-II/3 (Fig.1A), was collected by the Polish-Mongolian Expedition of 1965,
in the Djadokhta Formation of Flaming Cliffs. The natural cast of
tetradactyl digitigrade footprint (Fig. lB), was found underneath the pelvic
girdle by two of us (TS and GN), while the skeleton and matrix were being
recently prepared. The footprint size (9.1 cm wide and 7.8 cm long) fits the
supposed pes size of the associated individual. Toes are slightly projected
above the hypex. They are relatively broad and well patted with no discrete
phalangeal pads. Footprint morphology strongly resembles three times larger ceratopsian footprint, the specimen CU-MWC 227.1, from the Iron Springs Formation of Utah (Milner et al., 2006).



Gierlinski, G.D., and Nowacki, P. 2008. Middle Jurassic dinosaur track from the Polish Jura chain; pp. 46 in Uchman, A. (ed.), Second International
Congress on Ichnology Abstract Book. Polish Geological Institute, Warszawa.


ABSTRACT: The natural cast of dinosaur footprint (Fig. 1 LEFT) was found by
junior author on the Cybata Mount, near Przystajn, in the Czltstochowa
region (approximate coordinates: N 50°52"371'; E 018°40"002'). The find came
from the epicontinental Bajocian sandstones of Koscielisko Beds, from the
strata previously reported by Kopik (1967). Footprint (original specimen
owned by senior author) is 17 cm long with the three narrow and widely
divaricated digits, which lack their proximal pads. Similar footprints from
the Middle Jurassic of Utah and Wyoming are labeled as Carmelopodus Lockley
et al., 1998 (Fig. 1A). Those ichnites look like the enlargement of small
coelurosaurian subdigitigrade tracks of Wildeichnus Casamique1a, 1964 (Fig. 1B) and Skartopus Thulborn, Wade, 1984 (Fig. 1C).



Candeiro, C.R.A., and Tanke, D.H. 2008. A pathological Late Cretaceous
carcharodontosaurid tooth from Minars Gerais, Brazil. Bulletin of
Geosciences 83(3).


ABSTRACT: A theropod (Carcharodontosauridae) tooth exhibiting a split carina
is the first recorded from upper Maastrichtian MarĂ­lia Formation (Serra da
Galga Member), Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The distal split carina has a
distinct Y-shape. Split carinae have been reported elsewhere in Laurasian
theropods (tyrannosaurids and allosaurids).



Hummel, J., and Clauss, M. 2008. Megaherbivores as pacemakers of carnivore diversity and biomass: distributing or sinking trophic energy? Evolutionary Ecology Research 10.

ABSTRACT: Question: What is the trophic role of megaherbivores?
Hypothesis: Depending on their life histories, megaherbivores can either act
as sinks or distributors of trophic energy.
Methods: Comparative review of mammal and dinosaur faunas, and aspects of
their reproductive biology.
Conclusion: Extant (mammalian) megaherbivore populations represent trophic sinks that potentially limit carnivore diversity and productivity, because they are immune to predation and follow a reproductive strategy of very few,
well-protected offspring. In contrast, in dinosaur faunas, the
particularities of reproductive biology such as a larger number of offspring
and limited parental care made a major part of megaherbivore biomass
available to carnivores. Consequently, this increase in available trophic
energy allowed for larger body masses and higher species diversity of
dinosaur carnivores.

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Post autor: nazuul »

Ciekawe dlaczego nie porównali Chilantaisaurus tashuikouensis z megaraptorem. Może by coś z tego wyszło.
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
Sebastian
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1336
Rejestracja: 2 lipca 2006, o 13:32
Imię i nazwisko: Sebastian Oziemski
Lokalizacja: Harlow, Essex, UK

Post autor: Sebastian »

Macie może do nich dostęp??

Awatar użytkownika
Daniel Madzia
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1609
Rejestracja: 15 marca 2006, o 12:39
Lokalizacja: Třinec, Česká republika
Kontakt:

Post autor: Daniel Madzia »

Sebastian pisze:Macie może do nich dostęp??
Czesc z nich to tylko abstrakty z konferencji (3 postery [Gierlinski 2008a; Gierlinski, 2008b; Gierlinski i Nowacki, 2008] i jedno przemowienie [Gierlinski i in., 2008]).

Awatar użytkownika
Tomasz Singer
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1366
Rejestracja: 24 września 2007, o 09:44
Lokalizacja: Warszawa

Post autor: Tomasz Singer »

Byłem jednym ze współautorów wystąpienia o tropie protoceratopsa, (który znalazłem przy szkielecie, preparowanego przeze mnie) na konferencji Ichnias 2008. W trakcie wycieczek terenowych, uczestnicy zajechali do Bałtowa, gdzie ogladali tropy znalezione w Szydłówku. To te z ostatniego numeru Biuletynu Państwowego Instytutu Geologicznego.
Tomasz Singer

DINOZAURY

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Funkcja ozdĂłb lambeozaurynĂłw

Post autor: nazuul »

http://www.oucom.ohiou.edu/dbms-witmer/ ... _media.htm
Computer models done by other researchers suggest that the crests could have been used to make low, eerie bellowing calls that could have been used in communication, perhaps to call for mates or warn others of predators. The CT scans documented a delicate inner ear that confirms that the dinosaurs could hear the low-frequency calls produced by the crest.

“We were surprised to see just how large the centers of the brain associated with higher cognitive functions were,” said Witmer, Chang Professor of Paleontology in Ohio University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. “We suspected that the crested duck-billed dinosaurs used both vocal and visual displays, but now we see that they had the brain power and hearing to pull off these behaviors.”

When all the available information is put together, including the digital brain and ear casts, the evolutionary relationships of the species, and the growth pattern of the crest and its high degree of variability in different co-existing species, it supports the idea that the elaborate nasal cavity was likely used to produce sounds for communication. This study demonstrates the power of using an integrated approach combining 3D imaging, growth studies, and phylogenetic sampling to test ideas about the function and evolution of unusual structures in extinct animals.
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Dlaczego zauropody były tak duże?

Post autor: nazuul »

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... r-big.html
The herbivores, or plant-eaters, had hardly any teeth and are thought to have swallowed their food whole—an entire bush in one gulp, for example. They browsed large areas, barely moving and consuming vast quantities in short periods of time.

So they needed long necks to reach food high in trees and a huge gut to process and break down their unchewed meals
, said Martin Sander, a palaeontologist at the University of Bonn in Germany and co-author of the study, published tomorrow in the journal Science.

"You can only have this long neck if you don't chew your food, otherwise your head would be full of teeth and too heavy to support," he said.

(...)

To outgrow their predators, sauropods didn't just need lots of food. They also needed to develop fast, so they could attain their full size before being eaten, experts said.
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
hanys
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1012
Rejestracja: 24 lipca 2008, o 14:37
Lokalizacja: beWYRYhills

Taneczny parkiet dinozaurĂłw

Post autor: hanys »


Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Phylogeny of Ceratosauria

Post autor: nazuul »

Najświeższy news to nie jest, ale zamieszczam
Carrano and Sampson, 2008. The Phylogeny of Ceratosauria (Dinosauria: Theropoda). Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 6, 183-236.

SYNOPSIS
Recent discoveries and analyses have drawn increased attention to Ceratosauria, a taxonomically and morphologically diverse group of basal theropods. By the time of its first appearance in the Late Jurassic, the group was probably globally distributed. This pattern eventually gave way to a primarily Gondwanan distribution by the Late Cretaceous. Ceratosaurs are one of several focal groups for studies of Cretaceous palaeobiogeography and their often bizarre morphological developments highlight their distinctiveness. Unfortunately, lack of phylogenetic resolution, shifting views of which taxa fall within Ceratosauria and minimal overlap in coverage between systematic studies, have made it difficult to explicate any of these important evolutionary patterns. Although many taxa are fragmentary, an increase in new, more complete forms has clarified much of ceratosaur anatomy, allowed the identification of additional materials and increased our ability to compare specimens and taxa. We studied nearly 40 ceratosaurs from the Late Jurassic–Late Cretaceous of North and South America, Europe, Africa, India and Madagascar, ultimately selecting 18 for a new cladistic analysis. The results suggest that Elaphrosaurus and its relatives are the most basal ceratosaurs, followed by Ceratosaurus and Noasauridae + Abelisauridae (= Abelisauroidea). Several additional forms were identified as noasaurids, including Genusaurus. Within Abelisauridae, our analysis reveals a clade including Majungasaurus and the Indian forms, as well as a more weakly supported clade comprising Carnotaurus and Ilokelesia. These results greatly clarify the sequence of character acquisition leading to, and within, Abelisauroidea. Thanks to new noasaurid materials (particularly Masiakasaurus), numerous formerly ambiguous characters can now be resolved as either abelisaurid, noasaurid or abelisauroid synapomorphies. Skull and forelimb shortening, for example, now appear to be features confined to Abelisauridae. Nevertheless, a great deal of phylogenetic resolution is lacking, particularly among noasaurids, which hampers attempts to glean meaningful biogeographical information from the phylogeny. As a result, temporal and geographical sampling biases are probably contributing to the apparent patterns in the data and we suggest that definitive answers must await new discoveries. None of the recent ceratosaurian discoveries bear directly on the controversy surrounding latest Cretaceous ceratosaur biogeography.
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

KrzysiekLichota
Permski synapsyd
Permski synapsyd
Posty: 669
Rejestracja: 23 lipca 2006, o 09:37
Imię i nazwisko: Krzysztof Lichota
Lokalizacja: okolice Poznania

Dinozaury pod biegunem nie lubiły wędrówek

Post autor: KrzysiekLichota »


Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Re: Dinozaury pod biegunem nie lubiły wędrówek

Post autor: nazuul »

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/conten ... 0802096101

Abstrakt
Polar dinosaurs on parade: a review of dinosaur migration. 2008. P. Bell and E. Snively. Alcheringa 32: 271-284. pisze:Cretaceous polar dinosaur faunas were taxonomically diverse, which suggests varied strategies for coping with the climatic stress of high latitudes. Some polar dinosaurs, particularly larger taxa such as the duckbill Edmontosaurus Lambe, 1917, were biomechanically and energetically capable [=zdolny] of migrating over long distances, up to 2600 km. However, current evidence strongly suggests many polar dinosaurs (including sauropods, large and small theropods, and ankylosaurs of New Zealand) overwintered in preference to migration. Certain groups also appear more predisposed to overwintering based on their physical inability (related to biomechanics, natural history, or absolute size) to migrate, such as ankylosaurs and many small taxa, including hypsilophodontids and troodontids. Low-nutrient subsistence is found to be the best overwintering method overall, although the likelihood that other taxa employed alternative means remains plausible. Despite wide distribution of some genera, species-level identification is required to assess the applicability of such distributions to migration distances. Presently, such resolution is not available or contradicts the migration hypothesis.
Czyli edmontozaury mogły wędrować, inne pewnie zostawały :)

Dla prasy (press release):
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 102108.php
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

wszystkoĹźerny heterodontozaur

Post autor: nazuul »

Richard J. Butler, Laura B. Porro, and David B. Norman, 2008. A Juvenile Skull of the Primitive Ornithischian Dinosaur Heterodontosaurus Tucki from the 'Stormberg' of Southern Africa. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 28(3)

http://www.bioone.org/perlserv/?request ... 28&issue=3


Prasa:
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/10/2 ... osaur.html
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
Dino
Administrator
Administrator
Posty: 3696
Rejestracja: 13 marca 2006, o 20:45
Imię i nazwisko: Łukasz Czepiński
Lokalizacja: Warszawa
Kontakt:

Post autor: Dino »

Heterodontosaurids are an enigmatic group of primitive ornithischian dinosaurs best known from the Early Jurassic of southern Africa. Because fossil material is rare and often poorly preserved, the taxonomy, systematics, and palaeobiology of this clade are controversial. Here we describe a new partial skull of a juvenile Heterodontosaurus tucki from the 'Stormberg' of South Africa. This skull provides new information on the cranial anatomy of this taxon as well as insights into cranial ontogeny, sexual dimorphism and tooth replacement in heterodontosaurids. Few ontogenetic changes in dental morphology occur in Heterodontosaurus, supporting previous suggestions that tooth characters are informative for species-level taxonomy in heterodontosaurids. Furthermore, the presence of well-developed caniniform teeth in the juvenile specimen does not support the hypothesis that these represent secondary sexual characteristics in heterodontosaurids. Computed tomography reveals that replacement teeth are absent in both juvenile and adult specimens of Heterodontosaurus; however, the difference in the absolute size of the teeth between the juvenile and adult specimens demonstrates that replacement must have occurred during ontogeny.
Heterodontozaurydy są enigmatyczną grupą prymitywnych dinozaurów ptasiomiednicznych, najlepiej znanych z wczesnej jury południowej części Afryki. Ponieważ materiał kostny jest rzadki i często słabo zachowany, taksonomia, systematyka i paleobiologia tego kladu jest kontrowersyjna. Została opisana nowa, częściowa czaszka młodego osobnika Heterodontosaurus tucki ze stanowiska "Stormberg" w Afryce Południowej. Czaszka ta dostarcza nowych informacji na temat anatomii i ontogenezy czaszki, dymorfizmu płciowego i wymiany zębowej wśród heterodontozaurydów. Kilka zmian ontogenetycznych w morfologii zębowej, występujących u Heterodontosaurus potwierdzają wcześniejsze sugestie, mówiące że cechy zębów są informatywne dla taksonomii na poziomie gatunku (?) wśród heterodontozaurydów. Ponadto, obecność dobrze rozwiniętych zębów charakterystycznych dla mięsożerców (kłopodobnych) w okazie młodocianym zaprzecza hipotezom, jako że posiadały je tylko osobniki dojrzałe jednej płci. Komputerowa tomografia ujawniła, że wymienianie zębów jest nieobecne zarówno u młodocianych jak i u dorosłych osobników; co więcej różnica w całkowitym rozmiarze zębów pomiędzy młodocianym a dorosłym okazem demonstruje, że zamienność musiała występować podczas rozwoju osobniczego.
Ostatnio zmieniony 30 października 2008, o 17:47 przez Dino, łącznie zmieniany 1 raz.

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Post autor: nazuul »

materiał kostny jest rzadki i często słabo zachowane,
zachowany
z "Stormberg" z Afryki Południowej.
ze stanowiska?
Czaszka ta zapewnia nowe informacje na temat anatomii i ontogenezy czaszki, dymorfizmy płciowe i zamienności zębowej wśród heterodontozaurydów.
zapewnia->dostarcza
dymorfizmy płciowe->dymorfizmu płciowego
zamienności zębowej -> wymiany zębów (?)
Ponadto, obecność dobrze rozwiniętych zębów charakterystycznych dla mięsożerców (kłów?)
może "podobnych do kłów" albo "kłopodobnych"?
Komputerowa tomografia ujawniła, że zamienianie zębów
wymienianie?
co więcej różnice w całkowitym rozmiarze zębów
róşnica
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

DuĹźy teropod z Australii sprzed ok. 98 Ma

Post autor: nazuul »

Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

KrzysiekLichota
Permski synapsyd
Permski synapsyd
Posty: 669
Rejestracja: 23 lipca 2006, o 09:37
Imię i nazwisko: Krzysztof Lichota
Lokalizacja: okolice Poznania

Tyranozaur "miał nosa" do polowań

Post autor: KrzysiekLichota »


lama
Dewoński temnospondyl
Dewoński temnospondyl
Posty: 227
Rejestracja: 27 marca 2007, o 14:03

Post autor: lama »

Nic nowego od dawna było wiadomo że tyranozaury miały lepiej rozwinięty węch.

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Post autor: nazuul »

Oczywiście, to żadne przełomowe odkrycie
Zdaniem badaczy podważa to teorię, że zwierzę było padlinożercą.
Dla niektĂłrych to potwierdzenie tej teorii :o
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Nowe prace (10.2008)

Post autor: nazuul »

http://dml.cmnh.org/2008Oct/msg00193.html

O jednaj z nich już pisał Daniel tu.
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Post autor: nazuul »

Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Gniazdo maniraptora z Ameryki Północnej

Post autor: nazuul »

Obrazek
Liczy sobie 77 Ma i należało do cenagnatyda lub "raptora" (dromeozauryda?). Rzadkie odkrycie - pierwsze tego typu w Ameryce Półocnej. Dotychas jedyne gniazda teropodzie nalżały do troodonów.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 181200.htm
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
nazuul
Moderator
Moderator
Posty: 6690
Rejestracja: 3 grudnia 2007, o 19:51
Imię i nazwisko: Maciej Ziegler
Lokalizacja: Wielkopolska

Re: Anatomia części miękkich podniebienia Lesothosaurus

Post autor: nazuul »

Dino pisze:Zapowiada się ciekawie...
Poza danymi o podniebieniu, mnie zaciekawiło też to stwierdzenie:
basal ornithopod Lesothosaurus
Czyli, zdaje się mamy najstarszego znanego ornitopoda. Lecz nowsze analizy, wykonane po 1985 roku, prócz Butler* (2005 - uznany za bliskiego cerapodom) wykazują, to, co pisze Butler et al** w 2008:
it seems clear that Lesothosaurus is positioned close to the base of Genasauria, as either the sister-taxon to this clade (Sereno 1986, 1999a), the most basal known neornithischian (Butler 2005), or the most basal thyreophoran (this analysis).
:arrow: Może są jakieś jeszcze nowe analizy, wskazujące na przynależność lesotozaura do ornitopodów? Ma ktoś może tą prackę o której mowa w temacie?

*Butler, R. J. 2005. The ‘fabrosaurid’ ornithischian dinosaurs of the Upper Elliot Formation (Lower Jurassic) of South Africa and Lesotho. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 145: 175–218.

**Butler, Richard J.; Upchurch, Paul; and Norman, David B. (2008). "The phylogeny of the ornithischian dinosaurs". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 6 (1): 1–40. doi:10.1017/S1477201907002271
Obrazek
[Stamp: Apsaravis] [Avatar: P. Weimer, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

Awatar użytkownika
skrecu
Jurajski allozaur
Jurajski allozaur
Posty: 1544
Rejestracja: 11 listopada 2007, o 20:04
Lokalizacja: Wrc

Post autor: skrecu »

w tytule postu jest błąd
oryginalny tytuł mówi o anatomii części miękkich okolicy policzkowej w celu wykazania czy takowe posiadał (oraz wargi)
podniebienie nie ma tu nic do rzeczy (podniebienie to palate)
"Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known" - C.Sagan

d_m

najstarszy teropod?

Post autor: d_m »

Eoraptor i Herrerasaurus uważane są przez wielu za najstarsze teropody. Oba taksony pochodzą z osadów formacji Ischigualasto (Argentyna) wieku karnickiego. Teraz w starszych osadach tej samej formacji odkryto kolejny takson. Tym razem znaleziono niemal kompletny szkielet i fragmentaryczne szczątki kolejnych osobników. Nowy dinozaur przypomina najbardziej eoraptora.

Źródło: A New Basal Theropod from Ischigualasto Formation

Robert Bronowicz
Sylurski akantod
Sylurski akantod
Posty: 113
Rejestracja: 29 sierpnia 2008, o 15:16
Lokalizacja: Warszawa
Kontakt:

Post autor: Robert Bronowicz »

no, ciekawa sprawa.
a tak swoją droga to czasem nie "wieku karnijskiego" zamiast "karnickiego" ;) sam już nie wiem :)

ODPOWIEDZ